Singapore Girl femme fragrance and top travel locations to visit in Singapore

If you visit to Singapore you may want to see this awesome new tourist activity in Singapore. While you are there you can smell one iconic fragrance that was re-launched recently: Singapore Girl perfume. During this journey, Christina left Singapore for multiple museum visits and ceramic appreciation trips. While there, she had an internal awakening, realizing that her true calling in life was to create Singaporean scents. Christina came back to Singapore and invented the Singapore Girl perfume. Shortly after she went full force into the perfume line, and Perfumes of Orient was born.

Since its creation, Singapore Girl Perfume has had a beautiful packaging to elevate the experience of the users as well as to make the product stand out. In 1977, Singapore Girl Perfume won the top prize for best design and packaging from the Singapore Manufacturers Association. Singapore Memories knows that a luxurious bottle of perfume makes you feel like a million bucks. There are a million reasons why girls wear Singapore Girl but it boils down to the fact that it makes people happy.

Perhaps the most important name is its Chinese medicinal name: Heishanzhe. The Chinese herb Heishanzhe (A. rigida) is obtained from Guangdong, Guangxi and Yunnan. Chinese medicinal texts state that its roots and leaves relax muscles and joints, promote blood circulation and relieve pain, hence it is used to treat traumatic injuries and fractures. In Laos, leaves were used in making mats. In Thailand, the entire plant is used as a tonic to strengthen the body. Active Ingredients that made it medicinal are: 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, 4- hydroxybenaldehyde and 4-methoxymethyl phenol. Find even more information at Singapore girl scent.

The former City Hall and Supreme Court buildings have been refurbished to become Singapore’s National Gallery. It is the largest visual art gallery in the city-state and is mostly dedicated to local and Southeast Asian art from the 19th century to the present day. Many of the works on display are drawn from the permanent National Collection but there’s also a rolling programme of temporary exhibitions to check out too. Once a convent school, CHIJMES has transformed into a hip lifestyle enclave brimming with bars, restaurants and cafés. It’s currently undergoing a revamp – and it’s more than just a cosmetic update. A fleet of new F&B joints are flocking to the old school, including El Mero Mero, Here & There, and Prive.

For a look at what life in Singapore was like before it was all glamor and skyscrapers, visit the small island of Pulau Ubin, where fewer than 100 people still live in the same simple way as they did in the 1960s. The island’s name is Malay for “Granite Island,” a moniker given due to its past prominence as a quarry town. Today, it is a peaceful, rustic place where tourists can enjoy unspoiled forests and diverse wildlife. The island is also home to the Chek Jawa Wetlands, which contain a coral reef teeming with sea life. The island is easily reached by boat, a ten-minute ride that departs from Changi Point Ferry Terminal.

The most adrenalin-inducing thing to do in Singapore has got to be the G-Max Reverse Bungy, Singapore’s first ever bungy. Get launched skywards at 200 km per hour to a height of 60 metres and bounce for approximately 5 minutes. The experience is not unlike being an astronaut in a rocket launch as you sit in an open-sided ‘capsule’. Also, for a few extra dollars, riders get a T-shirt and a DVD recording of themselves in action, taken by an onboard camera. See extra details on Best Scented Singapore Souvenir.