Beautiful yachting locations and boat sailing news by intersailclub.com

Europe’s amazing yacht sailing destinations? Sitting on the eastern tip of Croatia’s coast, Dubrovnik is ideal for those looking to take some time out to recharge and enjoy the delights of discovering a new city. Bordered by sparkling Adriatic water, Dubrovnik is known for its Gothic architecture, dramatic terrain and buildings capped by baked clay-red rooves. The pace of life is slower in the city, so be sure to take some time to walk the stone streets and soak up the charms of Croatia. Trees grow everywhere, infusing the air with the scent of sweet figs and bitter oranges, for which Dubrovnik is renowned. If you’re visiting during summer, you’d be remiss not to check out the Dubrovnik Summer Festival. This celebration of classical musical sees the city come to life with music and art, with plenty of concerts and recitals on the schedule.

Italy has an extensive Mediterranean coastline, speckled with unbelievable islands, beaches, and beautiful towns. Sailing around southern Italy is always a popular choice for European cruise holidays. What makes this area even better is its close proximity to Greece – allowing you to include both countries easily into your sailing itinerary. As Italy has a rather lengthy coastline, the different destinations each offer something completely unique. Some of the best places to visit in Italy for a sailing holiday include Sardinia, Amalfi, the Aeolian Islands, the Sorrentine Peninsula, and Sicily. The Cinque Terre is another great coastal destination for those interested in sailing further north.

You might not always get the good weather but this part of the UK equals many of its European rivals in beauty. Over 95 miles of uniquely formed ancient coastline stretch all the way from East Devon to Dorset. Otherwise known as the Jurassic Coast, some of the rock formations here are 185 million years old and its England’s first natural World Heritage Site. Set sail from Weymouth Harbour and stop off at all the local beauty spots – Durdle Door, Lulworth cove and countless historic coastal villages.

Low season typically refers to any time outside of the high season periods. Groups of families and friends looking for a relaxing luxury vacation are advised to avoid high season weeks and opt for weeks outside of this time. The busiest periods are of course reflected in the charter costs and can be up to 15 to 30 percent more expensive than typical low season periods. Chartering a few weeks either side of these busy periods can be almost exactly the same, with the weather almost unchanged in some places, with far less crowds. Discover extra info on https://intersailclub.com/. Your broker will be able to provide you with an accurate estimation of all the costs involved in advance but here is a breakdown of what to expect. In general, you’ll find two basic rates: high season and low season, usually with specific dates set for each. In addition, you’ll find special events that are more expensive: New Year’s Eve, Monaco during the Grand Prix, Cannes during the Film Festival, the Olympics or the America’s Cup.

Sailing tip of the day: There’s a good reason to run the engine for a while before departing! This is my stern with the engine running slowly in gear against the lines. We all know that when we’re charging batteries this lets the engine warm up thoroughly. However, I have a different reason: I just changed the fuel tanks and return feeds. I once did this and let go my lines straight away only to have the engine stop two minutes later. I’d somehow made a mistake with the valves and was left with a full fuel-bleeding job with empty filters. Most of us with more than one tank change them in harbor. The entrance is exactly where we don’t want to lose power, so I always give the unit a 10-minute run in gear just to make sure that if it does pack it in it’s not for lack of fuel.